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harrigan. since mohamed morsi, the president there assumed near absolute powers through a constitutional move. he and the muslim brotherhood have been doing things that have a lot of people concerned in terms of ramming through a very controversial new constitution that the people have been very unhappy about. what's going on there. come back home now for a moment and take a look at the latest numbers we have got on the u.s. economy. the weekly unemployment numbers came in as they do every thursday. the labor department reported 370,000 americans filed for first-time unemployment claims. either way, either way, folks, your taxes will go up despite the haggling going on on capitol hill. you will be paying more to the u.s. government. stuart varney joins me now. so, stuart, that's the bottom line. this is what people i think across the country are starting to realize no matter what they negotiate, 2013 will be different for most of us. >> this is the untold tax story. everybody has been concentrating on tax the rich, yes or no. but the payroll tax holiday goes away january 1. neither polit
with president mohammed morsi with assuming dictatorial powers and ramming through a constitution that many fear will turn egypt into an islamic state. david shanker is the director of the program on arab politics at the washington institute for mere east policy and the former middle east adviser to secretary of defense donald rumsfeld. thank you so much for joining us. >> my pleasure. heather: you were there just prior to morsi's power grab. what was the mood then and did you see this coming? >> i think the brotherhood was very confident and morsi took the opportunity of course after the hamas negotiations of doing this. and i think he thought that he had it in the bag. the people were -- the liberals, the so-called liberals i think were upset, but there was no sign that they were going to actually unify and this really pushed it over the edge. heather: so they have banded together. what about the role of the military, in terms of morsi? the military backed the previous president hosni mubarak. on thursday they intervened for the first time in these latest clashes. what is their role with morsi
of egyptian president mohammed morsi reportedly torched the headquarters of the muslim brotherhood in a city east of cairo today. outside the presidential palace in the capital, thousands of islamist supporter of president morsi chased away opposition protesters who later returned in big numbers. fighting with rocks, fire bombs and sticks. tragic scenes tonight in philippines. stunned parents searching through a reof mud-stained bodies looking for missing children lost. the storm killed nearly 300 people in the southern philippines, including 78 villagers who perished during a flash flood. show and tell today on capitol hill. america's top intelligence official brought visual aids with him for his briefing on the september 11 terror attack in libya. chief intelligence correspondent catherine herridge tells us what lawmakers saw. >> the closed, classified briefing brought together state department and counterintelligence officials for status report on the 23-month-old investigation on benghazi terror attack. >> to the degree there was planning involved was this done over weeks, days or hours?
? >>> in egypt, president mohamed morsi is calling for talks to end the political crisis in the country. the opposition is calling for a boycott of that meeting. at least six people are dead after protests turned violent. anti-morsi supporters are demonstrating against the president and the new constitution. they say morsi has given himself too much power, but the president says the powers are only temporary and will become void once the new constitution is adopted. >>> now back to the u.s. and the controversy over the benghazi attack. secretary of state hillary clinton will testify at an open congressional hearing. her testimony will follow the release of a report by the state department's accountability review board. the state department has been under fire for its handling of the terror attack on the u.s. consulate in libya. >>> the syrian crisis could reach a new level. with concerns that the syrian regime could possibly use chemical weapons. we'll tell you how the u.s. is reacting. i plugged in snapshot, and 30 days later, i was saving big on car insurance. with snapshot, i knew wh
. mohammed, give us a sense. this is a pretty big fish for somebody to be leaving,nd i imagine he has valuable information as well being somebody part of the military police. >> reporter: that's right, suzanne. he identifies himself as a major general, that he's the chief of military police in syria. we spoke earlier with rebel free syrian army spokespeople. they said this was the man he claimed to be. the free syrian army helped to shuttle him to safety. it was a very difficult journey getting him from inside syria into neighboring turkey. it took far longer than they thought it would, and they were willing to help. other military officials wanted to defect for a certain amount of time longer. yes, as you said, if this turns out to be true and this man is as high-ranking as he said he is, this is a big blow to the regime. there's more and more high level defections the last several months. the fact more and more are coming seems to suggest he's losing more of a grip of power in syria. this is he not what they want out there when you have the u.n. and arab league enjoy trying to negot
mohamed morsi. he decreed recently himself above oversight. he's behind the draft constitution which protesters believe will tip power the his favor. here's what some told reza sa h sayah. >> he doesn't want to listen to our demands. >> what's your message to him coming out here. >> that what he's doing is completely unfair. this is not what we asked for. it's completely dictatorship. >> egyptians will vote on the new constitution on december 15th. >>> nato foreign ministers approved turkey's request for pate yoz missiles to defend its borders. that meant to shore up defense against violence that spills over from syria's civil war. back in october errant shells hit a turkey town killing five civilians. >>> a man pushed on to the subway tracks into the path of an oncoming train, his terrifying final moments laid out in a newspaper for all to see. if the crime wasn't horrible enough, these images are sparking outrage this morning. >> yep. >> first talking while driving, now eating behind the wheel is against the law in one town. find out where when we come back. questions? anyone have
is here. she's picking up that part of the story. >> embattled president mohammed morsi went on nationwide tv. he addressed the protests. he seemed to inflamed their outrage. within minutes, the muslim brotherhood headquarters in cairo was up in flames. reza joins us on the phone from cairo. we want to talk about president morsi in a second. first, you just arrived at the scene of the fire at the muslim brotherhood headquarters. what are you seeing, and what are you learning about who's responsible for this? >> reporter: let's verify what happened. two hours ago, they reported the main headquarters here in cairo was attacked by protesters and torched. we raced over here. we're in front of the headquarters right now. there's no indication of a fire here, but certainly there's a large group of what appear to be opponents of president morsi and the muslim brotherhood. they're trying to do everything they can to get to this building, and they're being blocked by police. so we have yet another standoff. if anyone thought president morsi's speech would pacify these people and calm them down, thi
are true even if mohamed morsi believes them. and one of those things is that there are a lot of old regime people around that have been really working to bring him down from the inside. even paranoids have enemies. he's a deeply paranoid guy right now. but he also is facing a lot of internal enemies. the overwhelming sense i had, mika, from being in egypt is how little the people there know each other. they have a blue states/red states problem that makes ours look like a day at the beach. and that's really -- as the lid has come off and you have these less religious brotherhood people and middle and upper class people from cairo and alexandria, these people do not know each other at all. this country really needs to go on a long weekend retreat. >> yeah, i don't think that's going to happen. you know, we saw the same thing, interestingly enough, in 2009 in iran where you had a lot of people in the cities opposing ahmadinejad, and you had people in more rural areas being far more conservative and supporting ahmadinejad. but carl bernstein, one of morsi's biggest problems right now is we lo
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10 (some duplicates have been removed)

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